Max Bucaille

18 06 2012

I tried to remember if I had ever created anything like Bucaille’s work. I love this work. Versions of this are probably the first collages I discovered. Its as if we have been drawn into another dimension, another reality. As I recall it was a magazine called Bizarre. Using some of their collages I wrote an English essay on Albert Camus. It was something about choices. It was actually 2 essays, split, running paralled down the page beside each other with these occasional collages. When I went to get my essay the English teacher (a pretty woman about 25) opened the door of her office about 3 inches and slid the essay out to me. She gave me a B. I think it was a B. With a big question mark at the end.

His work started in the 1940s. There is very little info about him except that he was good with numbers. And words. And that he had an obsession with his hair. Losing it. He also was not in shape. Failed to crack the rowing team at Oxford. Although I’m not sure he went to the school. Short sighted in his left eye he had an acute sense of smell.

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Randy Mora

2 03 2012

I must say I like his work. Randy Mora. Mostly. But I ask myself what makes his collages seem… unified. There is a neutral background. (And neutral colour) Upon which all the other images appear. And the images seem to grow out of each other. Rather than drift like planets in their solar system. And the images are very 50ish. A popular time for collage creators. His cuts are not seamless. He lets you see where the puzzle parts appear but the cuts are clean. And this fits in with the 50ish images. And I doubt that I will ever create anything that looks like these.

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When I wrote this review I felt like Martin Short’s Ed Grimley





Rafal Olbinski

28 02 2012

You can see Magritte. And Dali. I could go on. There is nothing wrong with having influences. And this artist has ideas. But he is not brilliant. Accomplished sounds insulting. And that is not my intent. But no matter how much I respect his work, I can’t help but thinking that I’ve seen each piece before.

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26 02 2012

David Halliday:

What lovely patterns. Isn’t this everyone’s fantasy. Quite a step up on snow angels.

Originally posted on Christy Heyob:

How much time would this take??! Wow!

Artist Simon Beck must really love the cold weather! Along the frozen lakes of Savoie, France, he spends days plodding through the snow in raquettes (snowshoes), creating these sensational patterns of snow art. Working for 5-9 hours a day, each final piece is typically the size of three soccer fields! The geometric forms range in mathematical patterns and shapes that create stunning, sometimes 3D, designs when viewed from higher levels.

How long these magnificent geometric forms survive is completely dependent on the weather. Beck designs and redesigns the patterns as new snow falls, sometimes unable to finish a piece due to significant overnight accumulations. Interestingly enough, he said, ‘The main reason for making them was because I can no longer run properly due to problems with my feet, so plodding about on level snow is the least painful way of getting exercise. Gradually…

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Inge Jacobsen

16 12 2011

Sometimes you have to take a look at artists who have a unique medium. In this case… knitting. Inge Jacobsen has created collages by knitting magazine covers, what she calls porno, newspaper clippings. Its clever. Though its not something that I would pursue myself. My fingers aren’t flexible enough. And I get knots.

Here is an interview with Ms. Jacobsen.

And her blog.

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Ray

11 11 2011

I first saw Ray’s work at http://chicquero.com/2011/10/26/the-art-of-pumpkin-carving/. It knocked me and many others out. Check out his home sight. More wonders. Toys and pumpkins and sand. I think he has to start working in a medium that lasts longer than a weekend.

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Dean Fleming

11 11 2011

Surrealism seems like an endless tapping of wonderful work. Dean Fleming’s art falls in that space. They are fun and inventive. They don’t knock my socks off. But then I’m not wearing socks. I’m wearing bandages.

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For an interview with the artist check out

http://eclectixetc.wordpress.com/2011/08/07/dean-fleming-eclectix-interview-4/








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